Our educational consultant offers a rare and unique service: tailor-made curriculum planning content based on individual and special interests, storytelling, and traditional classroom standards. It is especially for the gifted, but also for the unschooled. The lessons can stand alone, or function with others as an integrated unit. Most of all, they are designed as mobile kits. The materials are perfect for the tutoring or homeschool  settings. What's more, these units are adaptable to any intellectual level, and suitable for non-academic personal interest courses as well.

     Who thinks most learning have to take place inside of a classroom when one can actually experience it anywhere around the world? Our writers are busy transcribing HistoryPLUSArt's popular content from the conventional binder forms to audio and e-pub format. But that takes lots of time and more resources than we presently have.

     The grade one and two student will explore concepts connected to citizenship education, such as community, identity, relationships, respect, and stewardship, and be able to:

i. Describe ways in which roles, relationships, and responsibilities relate to identity and circumstance, and how and why change might affect roles, relationships, responsibilities and sense of self; compare significant traditions and celebrations among diverse groups and times, and identify some reasons for change in those traditions and celebrations

ii. Use an inquiry process to investigate the interrelationship between sense of self, role, relationship, responsibility, and various situations in daily life; use an inquiry process to examine past and present traditions and celebrations within their own family and community

iii. Demonstrate an understanding that people have different roles, relationships, and responsibilities, and that all people should be treated with respect, regardless of role, relationship, or responsibility; describe some community groups and how traditions and heritage are passed on by those groups

iv. Describe aspects of interrelationships between people and the natural and manmade elements of community, with a focus on how the community services meet people’s needs; describe similarities and differences in how people in two or more communities meet their needs and adapt to the location, climate, and physical features of their regions

v. Use an inquiry process to explore aspects of interrelationships between people and various natural and man-made features of local community, with stress on short- and long-term effects of interrelationships; use an inquiry process to examine the interrelationship between natural environment (i.e.: climate) of specific communities and lifestyles of people in those communities

vi. Describe significant aspects of community, refer to different areas, services, and natural and built features, demonstrate understanding of location and measurement of distance; identify and describe physical features of global communities, and describe people’s lifestyles in those specific communities Our learning objectives for grades three and four introduce more of the same, and extend beyond previous levels:

     The grade three and four student will explore concepts connected to citizenship education, such as beliefs and values, community, culture, power, identity, relationships, respect, and stewardship, and be able to:

i. Compare lifestyles among specific groups in early nineteenth century Canada or United States and describe changes between that era and present day; compare key aspects of life in a few early societies (3000 BCE–1500 CE), each from a different region or era representing a different culture, and describe key similarities and differences between early societies and present-day society

ii. Use an inquiry process to investigate major challenges that different groups and communities faced in Canada from 1780 to 1850 and describe steps Canadians and Americans took to address those challenges; use the social studies inquiry process to investigate ways of life and relationships with the environment in two or more early societies (3000 BCE–1500 CE), with a stress on interrelationships between environment and life in those societies

iii. Identify communities of early nineteenth century Canada and United States and describe their relationships to the land and each other; demonstrate an understanding of key aspects in several early societies (3000 BCE–1500 CE), each from a different region and era, and representing a different culture, with reference to their political and social organization, daily life, and relationships with the environment and to each other

iv. Show an understanding of interrelationships between the natural environment, land use, employment, and the development of municipal regions in Ontario; assess some key ways in which industrial development and the natural environment affect each other in two or more political and/or physical regions of Canada and the US

v. Use an inquiry process to explore the environmental effects of different types of land and/or resource use in two or more Ontario municipal regions, as well as some of the measures taken to reduce the negative impact of that use; use an inquiry process to study concerns and challenges associated with balancing human needs/wants and activities with environmental stewardship in one or more of the political and/or physical regions of Canada and USA

vi. Describe landform regions, land type uses in Ontario, and how land use in Ontario municipalities addresses social demands, such as the need for employment; identify Canada’s political and physical regions, describe some main characteristics and significant activities that occur in them

     The grade five and six student will explore concepts linked to citizenship education, including collaboration, cooperation, decision making, respect, rights and responsibilities, stewardship, beliefs and values, culture, equity, freedom, identity, relationships, and be able to:

i. Analyze key short and long-term consequences of interactions among and between First Nations and European explorers and settlers in New France prior to 1713; assess contributions to the Canadian identity made by various groups and various features of Canadian and American communities and regions

ii. Use an inquiry process to investigate aspects of the interactions among and between First Nations and Europeans in Canada prior to 1713 from the perspectives of the various groups involved; use a social studies inquiry process to study different perspectives on historical and contemporary experience of two or more distinct Canadian communities

iii. Describe significant features of and interactions between some of the main communities in Canada prior to 1713, with a particular focus on First Nations and New France; understand significant experiences of and major changes of life in varied historical and contemporary Canadian communities

iv. Interpret responses of North American governments to pivotal issues and develop plans of action for government and citizens in confronting social and environmental issues; define the importance of international cooperation with respect to addressing global issues and evaluate effectiveness of Canada's and Canadian citizens' actions in international arenas

v. Use an inquiry process to study Canada's social and environmental issues from several perspectives, including governmental responsibility for addressing those issues; use an inquiry process to examine some global issues of political, social, economic, and/or environmental importance, their impact on global communities, and responses to these issues

vi. Understand roles and responsibilities of citizens and different levels of government in Canada; describe relevant aspects of Canada's and Canadians' involvement in global regions, including impact of those involvements

*Based on guidelines by Ontario Ministry of Education and subject to change.